Creating Clear Mission and Vision Statements for Your Children’s Ministry

Mission vision

This post was written by Jen Edwards, a Kid Ministry Coach and Consultant.

As a ministry leader, you probably have big plans, grand ideas, multiple initiatives, and lofty goals that you want to accomplish. We all start there but isn’t it true that usually within a few years the shine and excitement have faded, and we are thrilled to just survive a Sunday? Why does this happen? I believe in part because we have failed to put boundaries around our ministry, and we have failed to give it an identity. 

If this is your story, you need a well-developed mission and vision statement. You need to craft these statements and let them lead you and your ministry.

First, let’s look at the definition of the words.

Mission: a strongly felt aim or calling.

Vision: the ability to think about or plan for the future.

If we were sitting down for coffee together, could you tell me what your strongly felt calling is? Could you tell me what your plan or dream is for the future of your ministry? I am sure you could, but can your volunteers or the families you serve?

I want to challenge you to:

  • Write your mission and vision statements down.
  • Make them clear.
  • Make them memorable.
  • Read them aloud.
  • Set them in place. 

What makes a mission statement?

A mission statement informs. It answers the questions:

  1. What do you do?
  2. Who do you do it for?
  3. How do you do it?
  4. Why is what you do important?

1. What do you do?

This should be easy to answer, but make sure that when you write this answer it is clear to someone who has never heard of children’s ministry. Make this as specific as you can. But before you recreate the wheel, see what your church’s mission statement says and if it applies to your specific ministry. You might be able to align your mission with the main church’s mission.

Example: “(Your Ministry Name) exists to lay foundations of Biblical truth and Church community in a child’s life at an early age…”

2. Who do you do it for?

Make sure this is specific. It is acceptable and best practice to have a mission statement that is different for all stages and ages. What your preschool children will need is quite different from what your elementary students need.

Example: “(Your Ministry Name) exists to lay foundations of Biblical truth and Church community in a child’s life at an early age, as we serve preschoolers each week…”

3. How do you do it? 

This is where you get to talk about your process and your curriculum. This takes the guesswork out of things and boils it down to a strategy for success.

Example: “(Your Ministry Name) exists to lay foundations of Biblical truth and Church community in a child’s life at an early age, as we serve preschoolers each week. We will utilize small groups, consistent leaders, and a creative curriculum to…”

4. Why is what you do important?

We know that what we do each week is important, but we must clarify why it is. Everyone serving on your team and staff at your church should know why what you do in children’s ministry is important.

Example: “(Your Ministry Name) exists to lay foundations of Biblical truth and Church community in a child’s life at an early age, as we serve preschoolers each week. We will utilize small groups, consistent leaders, and creative curriculum to ensure that the children we serve develop a lifelong love of God and His Church.”

Once you have answered all the questions and built your mission statement, say it aloud. As you listen to yourself say the words make sure it is accurate, doable, and that it lines up clearly with your church and your ministry. 

What makes a vision statement?

A vision statement is a vastly different statement from a mission statement. Its goal is to:

  1. Inspire
  2. Relate Goals
  3. Inform Values

1. Inspire

A good vision statement will inspire those you lead and serve. Children’s ministry is not easy and sometimes we are so busy with the details that we forget the big why. A good vision statement will remind us.

Example: “Believing there is no junior-sized Holy Spirit and that it is a sin to bore kids with God’s word, we will…”

2. Relate Goals 

Make sure you tell your audience what the goals are. This means your goals need to be simple and relate to all the ages you serve but be specific enough that they pertain to them. 

Example: “Believing there is no junior-sized Holy Spirit and that it is a sin to bore kids with God’s word, we will provide a safe, loving, and caring environment…”

In this statement the goals are clear. “Safe, loving, and caring environments” will be the goal that relates to all you do. This becomes a great boundary and guide for your team. 

You could tell your team that before they do anything they should ask:

  1. Is it safe? 
  2. Is It loving? 
  3. Is it caring?

If yes is the answer to all those things, then they can confidently move forward.

3. Inform Values

This part of the statement will inform all who read it, what you value as a ministry, and in turn, it will clearly state what you do not. 

Many times, children’s ministries are asked to provide babysitting or childcare. A clear statement easily allows all who read it to know that babysitting is not the mission or the vision. This statement acts as a guide, not only for all you do, but also gives direction to your answers when questions are asked of you.

Example: “Believing there is no junior-sized Holy Spirit and that it is a sin to bore kids with God’s word, we will provide a safe, loving, and caring environment that enables us to teach children the big truths of the Bible and build age-appropriate community because we know that children’s ministry is a vital part of the ministry of this church.”

Set in Place 

1 Corinthians 14:40

“But be sure everything is done decently and in order.”

This verse does not directly speak to how we do our children’s ministry, but it does lay the foundation for a ministry that is orderly and aligned. 

One translation defined “decently” as properly and organized, and “order” as done thoughtfully. I think it would benefit all ministries to have a mission and a vision statement that helps us do things properly and thoughtfully.

Now that your framework is in place, you know your objectives, you have described your goals, you have inspired your team, placed thoughtful boundaries, and informed each one of your values, use these statements as a guide for all you do. Before you host an event, provide childcare, choose a curriculum, ask:

Does this support my mission?

Does this align with the vision we have?

Let these answers help direct you.

Your ministry can make a statement and help align the whole church!


About Jen

Jen has 20 years of experience advocating and serving kids and families. Recently, she completed 10 years as the Kids Director at her local church but remains focused on mentoring and coaching Kids Ministers. She loves speaking to and encouraging those in the thick of parenting or ministry. In her spare time, she loves coffee, long walks by the water, and vacations with her amazing husband and 3 sweet sons. She can be found sharing on Instagram @jenfaithedwards and her website

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